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One-in-Six Helps Lift the Promise of Radiowave Cancer Treatment

One-in-Six Helps Lift the Promise of Radiowave Cancer Treatment

One-in-Six Helps Lift the Promise of Radiowave Cancer Treatment

In 2011, MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Tx., recognized the One-In-Six Foundation for its contribution to the cutting-edge Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment Project.

The Kanzius Project is studying the use of radio waves to treat nine different types of cancer -- including prostate cancer -- via an external radio-frequency machine. In 2003, following his own diagnosis with leukemia, the late inventor John Kanzius sparked the idea of using radio waves to heat and kill cancer cells targeted with microscopic pieces of metal.

Kanzius, who lived near Erie, Pa., died in 2009. His idea continues to gain momentum in studies on animals.

In particular, the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation reports preliminary findings showing cancer cells "have been destroyed noninvasively and with no side effects or illness" to subjects. Research is taking place at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Breast, colon, and lung cancer, melanoma and leukemia are among the cancers under study in the project.

In July 2012, the Erie Times-News published an article noting that Kanzius researchers at M.D. Anderson "are already getting results" and see exciting promise.

One-in-Six contributed to this research because it showed promise as an alternative method of treating prostate cancer without damaging healthy cells and without causing ill side effects.